A zoom that is not a zoom

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Mike G, Jun 9, 2017.

  1. Mike G

    Mike G FujiXspot Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    603
    Oct 7, 2016
    London
    Mike Gorman
    Searching back through my little grey cells, I recalled this Leica Tri-Elmar lens, and thought this would be a good idea for Fuji to adopt! what do you think of the idea?

    I was musing along the lines of 14-23-35mm focus lengths!

    Tri-Elmar.

    Maybe at f2.8 apertures with of course the Fujinon lens qualities.

    Just an idea
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Iansky

    Iansky FujiXspot Top Veteran

    988
    Feb 1, 2013
    The Cotswolds, UK
    Ian Lloyd-Grahm
    Great idea Mike but it would be a monster if f2.8 and I suspect even larger / heavier than the 16-55 f2.8.
     
  3. Mike G

    Mike G FujiXspot Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    603
    Oct 7, 2016
    London
    Mike Gorman
    OK, it's obvious that I'm no optical engineer, but I had in mind the 14mm f2.8 size and the newish f2 lenses!

    Just need to get the Japanese on board!
     
  4. Lensflare

    Lensflare FujiXspot Regular

    54
    Aug 6, 2017
    Where is the advantage over a more usual variable focal length? You are doing the same thing, but losing the ability to adjust in between for fine tuning the composition.
     
  5. Lightmancer

    Lightmancer Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Feb 2, 2013
    Sunny Frimley
    Bill Palmer
    There's no advantage. The Tri-Elmar was necessitated by the design of the Leica M rangefinder. The original Tri-Elmar was 28-35-50mm and was matched to the focal lengths available in the standard viewfinder - 28/35/50/75/90/135

    It was billed as a travel lens but it was slow - f4 - partly for reasons of weight, and partly to be small enough in diameter not to block the viewfinder window. It was not a true zoom, IIRC, running 28-50-35.

    Both MATE and WATE (mid- and wide-) versions are now out of production. They were massively complex to make and quite fragile in use, particularly the Mk 1 version. They were hard to repair too.

    You're better off with an actual zoom, believe me...