Considering Fuji system instead of Nikon

Discussion in 'Fuji X-Mount Cameras' started by ogotaj, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. ogotaj

    ogotaj New to FujiXspot

    1
    Mar 14, 2013
    I will start off by mentioning I am planning to get Fuji x100s and I'm rather very confident with this decision. I tend to do quite a bit of street photo and photography which requires people to stay natural thus the need for discrete small and quiet camera which I understand x100s is. My Nikon D300 is not exactly the perfect tool for this type of work and as I was thinking about I realized that replacing Nikon with XE-1 would also be some kind of solution.
    While I understand the advantages of Fuji system I also realize there are few shortcomings comparing to traditional DSLR system which Nikon is. So here is the thing - I do shoot some sport once in a while. Nothing too extreme, mostly Brazilian jiu jitsu tournaments. While in terms of ISO Fuji would greatly outperform my older D300 I am wondering whenever AF would be acceptable.
    I would like anyone who has a hands on experience with both Fuji and DSLR system to advise whenever using the first one has truly some major disadvantages as for example in sports. Can we even expect Fuji system to be able to replace DSLR systems in this kind of field in the future?
     
  2. Tdp

    Tdp Guest

    On the list of XE1 positive traits you will not find "high speed autofocus" listed. You could get it to work with pre focusing, zone focusing, high speed shutter, flash etc but if you just pick it up and set everything to auto and snap away at moving targets you will be disappointed.

    Of course there was plenty of moving target photography being done before autofocus....
     
  3. ean10775

    ean10775 FujiXspot Top Veteran

    885
    Feb 13, 2013
    Cleveland, OH
    Eric
    +1 to what TDP said. Its often said the X-Series cameras are no good for capturing action, but that is simply not true. Yes, they are not as good as a DSLR for capturing action and they struggle with subjects that are moving toward or away from the camera, but if the action you are photographing is moving side to side on the same plane of focus, as long as you keep your shutter speed high enough they work just fine. Pre-focusing on a spot you know your subject will hit and then snapping the photo when they get there also works. I was happy with my attempt at capturing a dance performance with the X-E1 + 35mm. I also shot with a 5DII and while I did better with that camera it wasn't by much. Then again, I also shot the UCI Cyclocross World Championships with my m43 kit and manual focus lenses and was happy with that. If you're willing to work at getting the shots you want and accepting of the cameras limitations I think you can probably do well with pretty much any decent camera, but its true that action is not the Fuji forte at the moment. If you need split second AF to capture a definitive sporting moment I would definitely look elsewhere.
     
  4. Tdp

    Tdp Guest

    ean10775 I also have a 5DII and M43 kit. Seems we have gear duplicity.
     
  5. ean10775

    ean10775 FujiXspot Top Veteran

    885
    Feb 13, 2013
    Cleveland, OH
    Eric
    Tdp - my m43 kit is pretty modest though, just an E-PL1 with a two zoom kit plus some adapted lenses. Actually my Canon kit is modest as well come to think of it.
     
  6. Gary

    Gary FujiXspot Top Veteran

    698
    Feb 15, 2013
    SoCal
    Gary
    I shoot a lot of sports/action photography. Firstly, and unfortunately, your image and equipment satisfaction level is directly linked to the expectations you demand of your images. This sorta muddies up the waters a bit. A professional will have higher exceptions of their images and equipment than a neophyte.

    I have high expectations for my images and I tend to speak in those terms.

    Action/sports is at the edge of camera performance. Capturing the exceptional sports image is difficult for general purpose cameras. While, any camera can certainly capture action, some can do it well and other cameras not so well. The easier the camera makes the capture the higher number of 'keepers', the lower your ratio of keepers to trash and the greater your consistency for capturing the exceptional image.

    General purpose cameras and my rating for ease of sports capture:

    1) dSLR (top of the line)
    2) µ4/3 (OM-D, GH3)
    3) SLR (manual focus, optical viewfinder, split image focusing), dSLR (entry models)
    4) X cameras / other µ4/3

    My experience is that there is a significant difference between each level. There is more to capturing the exceptional image in sports/action genre than a fast AF and clean high-ISO. Write speed, FPS, Lenses and for EVF cameras refresh rate is nearly as important as AF speed. Shooting with the OM-D, one of the fastest AF cameras around, you're are shooting blind after the first shot and the EVF may refresh on frame three (if you're lucky) or four, if you're shooting in CAF. If you are shooting sports with a dSLR, I think you will be disappointed and frustrated using an X camera. But it does matter on your personal expectation for your images. If you expect your images to be of 'publishable' impact with a high consistency factor, you will be disappointed. If you don't mind pre-focusing, slow EVF refresh rate, limited/no 'sports' lenses (long and fast lenses), then you'll be okay with X cameras.

    Gary
     
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  7. Iansky

    Iansky FujiXspot Top Veteran

    940
    Feb 1, 2013
    The Cotswolds, UK
    Ian Lloyd-Grahm
    I have a mix of cameras as well and use them in the following manners:

    1. DSLR Full Frame (Nikon 28 f2.8 / 50 f1.4 / 24-120 f4 / 300 f4) - used for sports / airshows and high quality images for advertising etc
    2. Mu43 (Pany GX1 + 14-45 / 25 f1.4 / 45-175X lens) - general purpose easy carry shooting with assorted lenses
    3. Fuji X100 - used mainly for landscape / street and occasionally portrait & group shots

    I do intend to keep all 3 formats as they do compliment each other and allow me to maximise image quality with ease of carrying depending on what I am shooting.

    I am also very interested in the X100s and if it lives up to all expectations and I can afford to I may just be tempted to let the X100 go at the end of the year and get the X100s, improved AF will be good for street and expand current capability as well as IQ.