Fuji X cameras replacement to my film cameras?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by photogfollett, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. photogfollett

    photogfollett FujiXspot Regular

    38
    Feb 2, 2013
    San Carlos, California
    John
    Having been a strictly film photographer for 40 years and swearing that I would never go over to the "dark side" of digital cameras, I found myself beginning to shoot almost entirely digital a year ago beginning with a Leica D-Lux 5 and then and then an X-10. All of my film photography for the last 10 years has been medium format with a Fuji GA645i (which I love) and a Graflex 2X3. I'm reluctant to get rid of my last few film cameras to fund the purchase of an X-Pro1 or the X-E1 which I hope to add this year, but don't see myself pulling the film cameras out anymore. Have any of you gone through the "ditching the film to go entirely digital" regrets?

    Oh, and great new X forum I might add!
     
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  2. Penfan2010

    Penfan2010 FujiXspot Veteran

    291
    Feb 1, 2013
    Central-ish NJ
    Ed
    Welcome to the forum, first of all. I went mostly digital about 5-6 years ago. I say mostly because I will still occasionally shoot B & W on my Pen F, Leica M3 and Yaschicamat 124G; I also still do home processing of my negatives, although I scan them digitally. There is still something special and "organic" and craft -like about shooting and processing film. That said, I have not had any regrets shifting to digital for most of my photography, although I did miss the traditional analog controls of my film cameras. That, in large part, is why I really like the Fuji X-series--their design and controls take the best of the old film cameras, IMO. In addition, shooting with the OVF on the X100 and X-Pro1 make me shoot more slowly and deliberately, and all the pre-visualization training from all my years shooting film came in handy. From a processing and printing standpoint, the post-production tools available are amazingly good--I have a long way to go in terms of being proficient with these tools, but you will see many great examples on forums like these of excellent post-production work.

    There are many folks on this forum as well as sister sites Serious Compacts and MU-43 who still shoot film ,so I am sure you can get good perspectives from them as well. Bottom line, you really don't have to go all digital; nothing can replace the look of film, but film can't beat the convenience and flexibility of digital, at least for me.
     
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  3. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther FujiXspot Veteran

    461
    Feb 2, 2013
    Texas
    Nah - I'm still shootin' with 3 film bodies....;)
     
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  4. landshark

    landshark Fujiman

    208
    Feb 1, 2013
    SoCal
    I have been shooting for over 30 years and still own a number of film bodies but other than an occasional fling I am 99% digital at this point. The Xpro is as close to a film rangefinder as one can buy.
     
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  5. photogfollett

    photogfollett FujiXspot Regular

    38
    Feb 2, 2013
    San Carlos, California
    John
    Yeah, I think it would be crazy to get rid of my few remaining film cameras especially for what you can get for them nowadays.
    It might take a little longer to scratch together funds for the next "X" Fuji but I'll just learn to have some patience. Thanks for the input
    everyone. I must admit though, viewing some of the member's images aren't helping with the GAS...
     
  6. Biro

    Biro Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    495
    Feb 1, 2013
    Jersey Shore
    Steve
    Remember that, as the new X100s and X20 hit the shelves, prices of the X100 and X10 will fall (actually they are beginning to fall already). So you can probably land a deal on a leftover or lighty used example. As far as the X-Pro and XE-1 are concerned, you'll have to wait a bit longer.
     
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  7. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. FujiXspot Veteran

    409
    Jan 31, 2013
    Albuquerque, NM
    I stopped shooting film for a couple of years after switching to digital, but gradually got back to doing it, and probably shoot 50% film (black and white) these days. I find digital entirely satisfying for color, but I like silver prints, and the processing steps required to get there. In fact I just finished building another, though much smaller darkroom, and buying a smaller, 2 1/4 enlarger to fit in it. So I'd be careful about getting rid of film cameras to finance a digital purchase unless you are pretty sure you won't look back at some point. I sold my 4x5 to finance my first digital SLR - the Olympus E-300, many moons ago -- and while I don't regret getting that camera, I do, now that my back is no longer giving me trouble, find myself wishing I had the 4x5 and lenses for slow, contemplative shooting. I won't ever again torture myself lugging a Majestic tripod in the wilderness, but I keep looking at 4x5's on ebay. So.... Never say never!
     
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  8. Penfan2010

    Penfan2010 FujiXspot Veteran

    291
    Feb 1, 2013
    Central-ish NJ
    Ed
    And then there are those shooting with an 8X20 view on top of mountains!

    http://theonlinephotographer.typepa...traditional-and-uncompromising-technique.html

    Really impressed that you still have a darkroom at home, and that you still shoot about 50% film. Look forward to seeing images from that 4x5 you might still get again!
     
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  9. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. FujiXspot Veteran

    409
    Jan 31, 2013
    Albuquerque, NM
    I'll have to build yet another darkroom to be able to fit my big enlarger in it. But -- never say never, as I said!

     
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  10. boid

    boid FujiXspot Regular

    31
    Feb 2, 2013
    I love the idea of film, but hate the reality of shooting film. I also live on the net, and that's where most (if not all) of my photography resides. So one way or the other what I shoot needs to be digitized.

    I find film emulators can do a fair job in approximating what I want to achieve with my pictures, plus I have micro-control over the process. What I miss though, is making "happy accidents" in the dark room. There are no accidents while processing on the computer. Either one knows how to work the software, or one doesn't. So loads of watching youtube videos tutorials, tonnes of attempts gently tweaking sliders, scribbling numbers on paper, all very unromantic, especially coming from film.

    VSCO does a fair job of emulating film especially with their custom camera profiles. Especially in LR. Though their best tweaks are reserved for Canonikon shooters. They do have some generic presets, one could give it a shot.

    Of course, if you're a tinkerer, film is just too much fun.
     
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  11. Phoenix

    Phoenix Ronin-13 Subscribing Member

    678
    Jan 31, 2013
    Melbourne, Australia
    Phoenix
    I've been shooting digital for about 3 years now, and I'm thinking about going out and getting a few rolls of neopan and / or tri-x for no other reason other than I've been missing it. I'm not a professional, I don't shoot photos for a living, it's just something that I do because I take pleasure in it.

    By the term replacement, are we talking about an apparatus that takes photographs? or the actual process of taking the photo? Technology gets better and better everyday, I guess if you rely photography to make a living, then a more efficient process that yields more controllable results can replace the process of messing around with a developer, scanner or enlarger.

    On the other hand if your missing the process of developing film, the thrill of having a limited number of shots, etc..then there's nothing quite like shooting film.
     
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  12. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. FujiXspot Veteran

    409
    Jan 31, 2013
    Albuquerque, NM
    Right. If I were shooting professionally, it would undoubtedly all be digital; the results are excellent and you can save the cost of film and its processing, which is high. Having made my living in custom photo labs where pros brought there film and negatives, I can attest to the fact that most pros do just that -- and the work I did for almost 30 years is near impossible to find.

    I found I missed shooting, developing, and printing film. It's something I know about, and who doesn't like doing what they can do well? For me, it's really that simple. Digital black and white can be exquisite, but it doesn't get me into a darkroom; it doesn't require me to advance the film; it doesn't let me shoot with a real rangefinder (because I cannot afford Leica's M9 and Voigtlander resolutely refuses to make a digital Bessa). Those are all things I enjoy doing.
     
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  13. EBC Wilson

    EBC Wilson FujiXspot Regular

    100
    Feb 20, 2013
    I was a total curmudgeon about going from film to that ^&^^&^(^!!!$#! digital photography. A big part of it was I could never find a digital camera that suited me. Then came the X's, and that was it.

    I still love film. It's utterly mindblowing to cruise the Film Camera ads in EBay and see cameras I could only dream of back then going for next to nothing now, and I get sorely tempted . . . except film production and developing/printing are vanishing before my eyes. The two biggest Pro Labs here in Nashville now no longer process ANY film whatsoever. My favorite pro shop's refrigerator for film is virtually empty. It would be hard to envision buying an F6 or an EOS-1 and taking the film . . . . to WalMart. Oh well . . . .
     
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  14. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther FujiXspot Veteran

    461
    Feb 2, 2013
    Texas
    I must admit to being quite fortunate to have a local lab that still develops & prints a variety of film types....:)
     
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  15. EBC Wilson

    EBC Wilson FujiXspot Regular

    100
    Feb 20, 2013
    I mean, is it just me? I see these EBay and CL ads for all these film cameras (and MF lenses) that are just SO cheap and I just start drooling. Then I think, 'but they'll be worth even less later, and where are you going to get film processing?' It's like seeing an ad for a Ferrari for $100 and realizing you could never get gasoline again . . . .
     
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