Hard decision

Discussion in 'Fuji X-Mount Cameras' started by elandel, Jun 24, 2017.

  1. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    Hi all! I have a hard decision to take. I can give my xt1 for a new xt10+35 f1.4.
    Now I'm not using very much my xt1 because of the xp1 that I love. I also have an xt20 so my thought is that if I give in my xt1 and get an xt10 with the 35 f1.4 lens I'll still have a second generation body WITH a new lens that I would like to try.
    Maybe its only GAS but what would you do in my
     
  2. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    I forgot to say that Tuesday I'll get the 10-24. YAAAAY!!!!:drinks::drinks:
     
  3. Lightmancer

    Lightmancer Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Feb 2, 2013
    Sunny Frimley
    Bill Palmer
    Glass is always a better choice than bodies.
     
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  4. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    So you say xt10 with 35 f1.4?
     
  5. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    This! ^^^^^

    The old saying is invest in glass, buy bodies. Every camera Fuji makes is capable of incredible images. And it does not seem that you have specific needs out the performance of the body. Like shooting events, weddings, or sports.
     
  6. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    I don't shoot sports or wedding but now I was asked to take photos at a local group event. This group meets once a month. It's not really my job so I'M a bit worried because I mainly shoot landscapes or travel but not portraits or reportage of group events or meetings. Thats why I was wondering if a 35 mm could be of some use for me. Obviously I'M not paid.
    I would appreciate any tips you could give me.
     
  7. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    I should have phrased that differently. It was not correct of me to imply that the T10/T20 are incapable of shooting events. I would not want to rely on the X-Pro1 for an event due to the slower refresh rate of the EVF.

    I have shot an event with a pair of X-T10's. A comic con a couple of years ago. The camera is capable of the job, as should be the X-T20 you have. I don't like the ergonomics of those bodies for working an event. Holding the cameras and shooting that much became fatiguing to my hands. It didn't help that I was using some of the larger Fuji lenses. For me, the X-T10 was a great walkaround/street/landscape camera. But because I do cover a good amount of events, I went back with a X-T1 setup at the time. And now I'm working with a X-T1/Pro2. Soon to be just the Pro2. Maybe with a X-E3 backup if that body should ever become a reality.

    The X-T10/20's sensor, autofocus, EVF refresh rate, and rear LCD are more than up to the task of shooting an event. And portraits.

    If you are interested in shooting the event you mentioned, be up front with the group that shooting events is new to you. That will take the performance pressure off of you and keep their expectations realistic. If you have any specific questions about shooting an event, feel free to ask.
     
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  8. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    Thanks. Are my lenses suited for these evewnts or do I need something else?
     
  9. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    Remind which lenses you have. We've had so many gear discussions going on here lately I've started mixing up who has what :laugh1:
     
  10. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    I have: 18-27-18-55-18-135 and from next week 10-24.
    Think I'll sell the 18mm to help fund the 10-24. Or should I sell the 27?
     
  11. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    Sell the lens you don't use, or use the least. You have both focal lengths covered on two other lenses.

    As for event shooting, the 18-55 and 35 1.4, if you get it, are going to be your best lenses. The 35mm gives you f1.4 if the lighting is really bad. The 18-55 gives you a good range and great image stabilization if the lighting is really bad. For all the events I shoot, not including weddings, I can cover them with 16-55/50-140's 2.8 aperture. Your 18-55 is a variable aperture going to f4, but it has really good imagestabilization.
     
  12. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    I'll sure sell the 18, a little in doubt if I should also sell the 27.
     
  13. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    The 18-55 is a lot sharper@18mm. And you only lose one stop of aperture. If you use the 27mm, you should keep it. If you find it sitting and never on the camera, then sell it.
     
  14. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    Got the 10-24 this afternoon.
     
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  15. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    Congrats on a great lens.
     
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  16. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    Thanks
     
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  17. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey Super Moderator

    Feb 15, 2013
    Hood River, OR
    Kyle
    I find it helpful to always remember what the organizer who asked me to shoot wants, and to make a basic shot list, at least mentally, before shooting an event. Something like ...


    1. Wide "coverage" shots that set the scene for what it looked like to be there. Widest lens you have, get as high up as you can (balcony? stairs? stand on a chair at least and shoot arms extended over your head using rear lcd), and DO NOT take the shot until the event is at its fullest attendance. If you find a balcony railing to prop on, consider intentional long exposure -- blurred people walking + some stationary people is a neat effect and conveys "busy / well-attended".


    2. Next most important is “Presenters” shots. You stand wherever the hell you need to, to get a clean shot of them, as long as you’re not blocking anyone’s view. Get every speaker or presenter, and take more “talking” shots than you think you need, because later when you review your shots, they’re going to be making ugly /unflattering faces in 90% of them. Wait for the punchline, because when everyone applauds they always smile.


    3. Participant shots. Long, fast lenses are the best here – the 55 at f4 might be fine with good light. If it’s dark, go 35 f1.4 and get closer. If there’s no LED lighting, you can probably switch to electronic shutter here and you’ll be silent, which helps you not be noticed. Decision: are you a people person? If so, you can choose to tap people on the shoulder who are talking and smiling and ask them to group together and smile. They’ll all say yes. If not, skip it and be a sniper. Watch the faces. People into a really good conversation will be smiling and gesturing, and will also be less likely to notice you… be quick about it. If they look up and notice you, smile, say “thank you!” and move on.


    4. Logos… do the organizers of the event have a logo? Is it on display? Put it into shots, nice and clear. They will like it.


    Once you’ve checked all these boxes, and you KNOW you’ve got all these in the can, you’re free to experiment. I like to look for symmetry, get that shot framed up, and wait for someone interesting to walk into it. I also like to flatter the volunteers and workers by getting good shots of them hustling and smiling.
     
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  18. elandel

    elandel FujiXspot Regular

    120
    Feb 4, 2014
    Thanks for your help.
     
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  19. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    Kyle gives great advice. I'm terrible at writing it out. A couple of things to add. Along with L.E.D. lighting. Fluorescent lighting is also bad with the electronic shutter as it can give you black lines in the image which can not be removed in post. Also Fluorescent lighting can cause yellowing in the white balance.

    When you are getting participant interaction shots, don't someone with their mouth open while talking. Looks great for singers, not so much for people in conversation.
     
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  20. plaatje

    plaatje FujiXspot Regular

    51
    Mar 11, 2016
    Jos
    If this group is not to big don't forget to take a photo of everyone there, and I mean everyone. When I did these kind of photography I noticed that " forgetting " someone is painful for that person and therefore also for the one"guilty", the photographer . . .
    Good luck!
     
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