Max Shutter Speed to Use Image Stablization

Discussion in 'Fuji X-Mount Cameras' started by Xt Jerry, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. Xt Jerry

    Xt Jerry New to FujiXspot

    3
    Mar 29, 2016
    I read that on some cameras that a faster shutter speed using image stabilization can actually cause blurrier images that not using it. If this is so for Fuji X series lenses, then what is the maximum shutter speed that it is safe to use image stabilization? I assume that this could vary either with focal length or ...?

    Jerry
     
  2. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey Super Moderator

    Feb 15, 2013
    Hood River, OR
    Kyle
    I've never heard of such a thing, and I've used image stabilization on the 18-55 up to 1/4000 of a second without issue. Maybe someone else knows better / different?
     
  3. Lightmancer

    Lightmancer Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Feb 2, 2013
    Sunny Frimley
    Bill Palmer
    Not something I have encountered either. I know to turn it off if I've mounted the lens on a tripod, but I've not heard of or had an issue with high shutter speeds. Can you quote a source, please?
     
  4. flysurfer

    flysurfer X-Pert

    Feb 1, 2013
    Nuremberg
    Rico Pfirstinger
    Obviously, the OIS can also do harm, and it's not trivial to determine when to switch it off and when to use it. Usually, we want to switch it off at the point where the OIS can't improve the image (aka where it becomes useless, but still potentially harmful). At this point, it's reasonable to turn it off to avoid any possible interference.

    Sadly, this point can't be automatically detected, so there's no "auto on/off" feature that would switch the OIS on and off at a certain point. It's up to the user to determine when and where to use the OIS or not (and which OIS mode to select). Factors are the environmental conditions (wind, traffic vibrations, stability of a tripod etc.), the ability of the photographer (shaky hands), the focal length and the shutter speed. The camera only knows the latter two factors, not the first two. Hence no "auto on/off".

    Luckily, we have a few basic recommendations, like setting mode 2 for faster speeds and mode 1 for slow speeds, not using the OIS on a sturdy tripod or switching it off when really fast shutter speeds are used. Then again, there are exceptions for each rule, so don't stop thinking. For example, I could recently use the OIS at 1/2000s in a helicopter with a 18-55mm kit zoom, so don't blindly follow any guidelines.
     
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  5. Xt Jerry

    Xt Jerry New to FujiXspot

    3
    Mar 29, 2016
    Rico, I would agree that there is no hard-fast drop dead point to stop using OIS, but is there a general area where it would do more harm than good under most hand held situations where I need to be tuned in to use or not?
     
  6. flysurfer

    flysurfer X-Pert

    Feb 1, 2013
    Nuremberg
    Rico Pfirstinger
    It's usually best to test it in a particular situation with OIS on and off and see what option gets you better results (that's what I did in the helicopter, how else could I even know that the OIS can actually be of benefit at 1/2000s).

    I wouldn't know about general areas, there are too many variables: lens (OIS version), focal length, shutter speed, photographer's ability, environment, subject and shooting style (tripod shots, panning shots etc.).

    Usually, photographers know what shutter speeds they can master w/o OIS from experience (shaky hands etc.). Practically, OIS mostly isn't required for action shots at fast speeds like 1/500s and faster as long as the lens isn't longer than 200mm.
     
  7. Xt Jerry

    Xt Jerry New to FujiXspot

    3
    Mar 29, 2016
    Thanks again. I was just hoping to tap your wisdom an save myself a lot of testing. But, as the saying goes - there is no free lunch.

    Jerry
     
  8. flysurfer

    flysurfer X-Pert

    Feb 1, 2013
    Nuremberg
    Rico Pfirstinger
    Yep. The only general rule is (to be on the safe side) to switch in off in situations where you know that is can't be beneficial anymore.