Should I sell my X-T1?

Discussion in 'Fuji X-Mount Cameras' started by mesmerized, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. mesmerized

    mesmerized FujiXspot Regular

    83
    Mar 26, 2014
    Dear Users,

    I'm not a very active member (nor a very active photographer) but I wanted to seek your opinion on a matter that has been bothering me for a while. I've owned only two real cameras in my life. Olympus E-PL1 and Fuji X-T1. I definitely have a lot to learn when it comes to photography, but... I've been thinking... should I sell my X-T1? I've never taken a single picture I'd be happy with with this camera. I love its design, I love the way it feels, the way it looks, I love the knobs... but for some reason all of the pictures I've taken with X-T1 are either not sharp enough or lack the colors I see in other people's pics... I was thinking of selling my X-T1 and going after a full-frame Sony A7 II.

    I'd be happy to upload some of those pics and wait for your criticism, but it really drives me crazy that I haven't taken even one good picture with my X-T1, despite the fact that I've had it for a year.

    Cheers
     
  2. Christilou

    Christilou FujiXspot Veteran

    317
    Feb 1, 2013
    I honestly don't think you'll find the A7II that much better. Yes, it has better IQ but you will find it much harder to use I think. On a full frame camera much less will be in focus using wide open apertures and you may find this a distinct disadvantage. If you're not happy with the X-T1 it may be that the camera is defective or that you simply need to become more familiar with it. The only way to progress with photography is like anything else, keep trying and experiment. Find out which settings will make pleasing pictures for you. Peruse the web and look at other people's pics, look at some Fuji blogs. Most people are very generous and will share their settings with you. If you aren't that interested in photography and will only use the camera sporadically, you might be better off with a simple point and shoot that requires much less input from you, leaving you to simply frame your picture:)
     
  3. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther FujiXspot Veteran

    461
    Feb 2, 2013
    Texas
    If you're happy with Olympus & Micro Four Thirds? Why not just stick with one system - it's at least cheaper than trying to maintain two systems. :)
     
  4. kevistopheles

    kevistopheles FujiXspot Veteran

    419
    Oct 18, 2014
    Bellingham, WA
    Kevin
    In my transition to Fuji from Sony I found the images seemed to be rather flat and a little soft. What I realized us that images coming from my XE1 (and I would assume all Fujis) are by default very neutral. Canon files are very similar. I found that to get the best out fi the Fuji you need to tweak the settings if you are using JPEG or shoot RAW. if you do you will find the Fuji capable of some outstanding images. I have for a while considered selling my Fuji and going back to Sony and there are valid reasons but image quality is not one of them. IMHO Fuji images are a bit better than what you get from APS-C Sony cameras.

    RT Panther also has a point that if you like m43 why not stay with it?
     
  5. mesmerized

    mesmerized FujiXspot Regular

    83
    Mar 26, 2014
    Thanks for all replies!

    Perhaps I should have mentioned that I don't own E-PL1 anymore. I sold it half a year before I bought X-T1. I only had a kit lens and a 45mm portrait lens so it never had been a big investment. As far a Fuji goes, I only have a kit lens. I find other lenses to be quite pricey to be honest. I can sell it without losing much, if anything, 'cause it's in prime condition and the in country I'm going to these cameras are more expensive than where I bought it.

    Perhaps I could upload some pictures on flickr and you could have a quick look? I'm not even a decent photographer but I have no idea where I go wrong.

    The thing is that whenever I take my Fuji with me, whenever I want to take a quick snapshot at something interesting... I fail because it takes me quite a while to adjust the settings. What's more, I've seen pictures taken with an ipad that look better than my pictures of the same object taken with my X-T1 <sic!> :/

    Cheers
     
  6. Luke

    Luke FujiXspot Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    857
    Jan 31, 2013
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    after reading everything you write, I think you need to sell it. It's not the right tool for everyone. And if you're not getting the results you want with it, why fight it.
     
  7. Jeffryscott

    Jeffryscott FujiXspot Rookie

    24
    Sep 22, 2013
    Arizona
    A camera, any camera, will not make you a better photographer. Becoming a better photographer takes an investment in your time. Learning the fundamentals that you can then apply to any camera you pick up.

    It honestly sounds like the Fuji is way more camera than you require, or need or want, and you would be far better off with a good point and shoot. Going to a Sony A7-series is not your answer.
     
  8. the sardonic iconic

    the sardonic iconic FujiXspot Veteran

    218
    Feb 2, 2013
    NYC
    The camera is not the problem. Clearly the X-T1 is capable of incredible images, many time straight out of camera. Study composition and light more, and spec sheets less. Learn post-processing. Getting an A7 solves NONE of your root problems.
     
  9. mesmerized

    mesmerized FujiXspot Regular

    83
    Mar 26, 2014
    I definitely don't want to go to point & shoot type of camera. That would be like a step down.

    This is the part of photography I really hate. I'd like to take shots decent enough without having to tweak them afterwards.

    I'll try to upload a few pictures to show you what I'm dissatisfied with. The biggest issue I'm having is that many pics (especially those of people) are not sharp... That drives me crazy.
     
  10. SnapDawg

    SnapDawg FujiXspot Veteran

    276
    Dec 30, 2013
    behind an [X°]
    Ken
    If you can't get good images from a compact camera or point and shoot you won't get them from a larger camera, unless all you're looking for is resolution/sharpness, shallow DOF and bokeh but photography is far more than that. Ever heard that a Montblanc Meisterstück with a 24k gold nib or the latest text processor made someone a better writer?

    Each and every image can benefit from a little PP and I'm not talking about excessive manipulations in Photoshop. If in doubt ask the masters like Ansel Adams.
     
  11. Warwick

    Warwick FujiXspot Rookie

    24
    Mar 11, 2014
    If that were a general feature of Fuji X photos I'd be worried. But if you look at some of the pictures on this forum or elsewhere, that's clearly not the case. Nor would pro photographers go anywhere near the system - especially not people like Annie Liebowitz, who has an X100 series camera. So my feeling would be to try to work out why I'm not getting the sharpness that others get - is it the way you're focusing? Your shutter speed setting? And if I really couldn't sort that out, I'd see if a different kind of camera might suit me better.
     
  12. the sardonic iconic

    the sardonic iconic FujiXspot Veteran

    218
    Feb 2, 2013
    NYC
    You need to give some details (what lenses are you using? what film simulation? what are your jpeg/image settings in camera?) and post some samples of images that you're not happy with.
     
  13. Luke

    Luke FujiXspot Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    857
    Jan 31, 2013
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    definitely post some sample images. If they're not sharp (which isn't a prerequisite for a great photo) it could be a setting, or a slightly missed focus....both of which can be fixed.
     
  14. kevistopheles

    kevistopheles FujiXspot Veteran

    419
    Oct 18, 2014
    Bellingham, WA
    Kevin
    Well, if you don't like the XT1 then by all means sell it. Sometimes we just do not like a camera for whatever reason and that's as valid a reason to change as any. Now, I don't think the XT1 is the problem nor is the A7 the solution. The XT1 is certainly capable of great images (as is the A7) but you may want to look at what it is you want. If you came from Olympus you probably like the kind of nice, sharp punchy output that Olympus jPEGs can give you. They are very pleasing. You won't get that from the Fuji default settings or from any Sony camera. Olympus default JPEG settings are very nice and if what you want is to just pick up the camera, snap away and get great SOOC images with no post processing then Olympus is probably the way to go. Fuji's require post processing to look their best and Sony even more so.
     
  15. the sardonic iconic

    the sardonic iconic FujiXspot Veteran

    218
    Feb 2, 2013
    NYC
    http://imgur.com/a/wAueq

    This is an album of straight out of camera JPEGS from a wedding booking I had this past weekend. I shot RAW + JPEG (small resolution, normal quality)... these are the JPEGS. My JPEG settings: Classic Chrome, Color set to normal, +1 Highlight tone, +1 Shadow tone, -1 sharpening, white balance (auto): +2 R +2 B, lowest noise reduction. I can't even begin to imagine a different camera system that could produce such ready to ship JPEGS as the Fuji line.
     
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  16. tyrphoto

    tyrphoto FujiXspot Regular

    104
    Sep 15, 2014
    Seoul | NYC
    ㅇtㅈyㅅr
    This might sound rather crass but if you can't get nice images out of the X-T1, switching to the A7II is not going to solve your problem. Getting good images is IMO 10% camera, 90% photographer. Also IMO and for me, choosing a camera is just as much about UI and ergonomics as it is about technical specs. Although it's a cliche, a camera is just a tool.

    In the film days, choosing a certain film for a certain look and film developing skills were important to getting the final image you wanted. With digital cameras, post processing is a skill that every "serious" photographer should learn to "develop" their final image. There's nothing wrong with using SOOC images just like there was nothing wrong with getting your film developed at the local 1-hour photo store. Everyone has different levels of wants and needs.

    If you're only wanting to use SOOC JPEGs and not interested in shooting RAW and post processing, then you need to play around and tweak the JPEG settings to your liking. This can take a awhile depending on how much you shoot and how much time you dedicate to yourself to finding the settings that are right for you, especially with a camera like the X-T1 and other Fuji cameras where you have not only your typical color, shadow, highlight, sharpening, noise reduction settings but also all of the film emulation settings. It takes awhile to find the right balance that suits your needs. One thing that I can say from my experience is that once you find the right settings, the JPEG output of the various Fuji cameras is quite impressive.
     
  17. kevistopheles

    kevistopheles FujiXspot Veteran

    419
    Oct 18, 2014
    Bellingham, WA
    Kevin
    I think it depends what the OP is looking for in their images. Fuji JPEGs CAN look great but you have to tweak the settings and IMHO use the film simulations). The default settings are very neutral and can look a bit flat and soft. Not that I am a big Olympus fan (because I'm not) but if you want that "pleasing" SOOC JPEG look the default setting for Olympus are very punchy and sharp. They're not my cup of tea but I can see the appeal.
     
  18. Odille

    Odille FujiXspot Rookie

    20
    Jun 16, 2015
    Glenorchy, Tas, Australia
    Odille
    And WHAT LENSES? The camera is only part of the shooting setup, the big factor os the lenses.
    You cannot escape PP. In film days you wouldn't have given clients the negatives, and if you want to completely skip PP that's what you are trying to do.
    I'm afraid if you don't want to take the trouble to learn to process then forget about being a photographer, you are not enjoying it, obviously, and only some work will remedy the situation.
     
  19. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey Super Moderator

    Feb 15, 2013
    Hood River, OR
    Kyle
    This was the XE2 (same exact sensor) and the 18-55 that you're also using. This was slightly processed in post, but only from jpg, not from the RAW file. Have a look at the sharpness at full resolution, and tell me if it's sharp enough.

    18491064820_d1c051a688_c. TOMK3223 by gordopuggy, on Flickr

    Then consider that I didn't just walk up to the rock and fire on Auto. I dictated ISO 200 and a middle aperture, so that the lens would be shooting in its sharpest range, and so that the background would be barely out of focus. Are you aware of how these things work? (Honest question, not sarcasm). If you're shooting on full auto and have no idea what settings the camera is picking, then throwing money at a Full Frame camera is going to be a really expensive, humbling exercise. It will give you larger, equally blurry files.
     
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  20. Luke

    Luke FujiXspot Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    857
    Jan 31, 2013
    Milwaukee, WI USA
    Luke
    Also, while many DO post SOOC photos here that are sharp and well exposed, a lot of the photos you see here are tweaked quite a bit. I rarely would ever bother posting a photo SOOC anymore unless it were to prove a point. Yes, the SOOC JPEGs are great, but one can always improve on them. Here's a simple grab shot I took a local garden SOOC (with the 18-135mm).......
    18880606131_63e688a8fa_b. DSCF5146 by Luke, on Flickr

    not a fantastic shot...... but I was just seeing if I could catch the little chipmunk....I wasn't trying to create great art. But I wanted to see if I could make it "pop" a little. Here's my finalized version

    18880542121_bd102b6c31_b. Chippy by Luke, on Flickr

    .....still not great art, but you can see what 2 minutes of PP can do.....if you want better photos, spending a little time learning to PP an image will improve your images 1000% more than a new camera.......only get a new camera if you don't like the way the camera "works"...the UI. All modern camera expose properly and are plenty sharp.
     
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