X-T 20 Surprises

Discussion in 'Fuji X-Mount Cameras' started by Dave Jenkins, Dec 21, 2017.

  1. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins FujiXspot Regular

    61
    Jul 15, 2015
    Dave Jenkins
    After using Canon for 24 years as a full-time professional, I sold my entire outfit over the summer and switched to Fuji. (Before selling the Canon stuff, I dipped my toe in the water with an X-Pro 1 and a 16-50 lens.) A few months later I bought an X-T20 and added 18-135mm, 50-230mm, and 27mm lenses. The 27 pretty much lives on the X-Pro 1.

    Since I also use Olympus EM5s, I didn't expect the small size of the X-T20 to be a problem; however, I didn't take into consideration the fact that X-system zooms are mostly larger. I bought a leather half-case, so we'll see if that helps with the handling. Makes me wonder if I should have gotten an X-T1 instead -- I can't afford an X-T2.

    Last Friday I photographed my first wedding with the Fujis, and I have to say it was not a pleasant experience. The venue was dark, and I found to my dismay that the X-T20 would not work with my Yongnuo 622C flash transmitters. I should have tested that well before the wedding, so that's my bad. The transmitters worked okay with the X-Pro 1, so that's what I used for multi-flash setups. Not what I would have preferred. It missed focus a few times, but did better than I had been led to expect in low light. I missed my Canon.

    Since I'm 80, I don't photograph as many weddings as I used to. But I have another one booked in March, so I have to work out the kinks with Fuji or borrow a Canon outfit. I very much want to make the Fujis work, because I'm finding that the X-T20, in particular, is capable of amazing image quality. The accompanying photo is of my granddaughter dancing with the Knoxville Symphony orchestra. The lens was the 50-230 at full extension and the ISO was 6400. A delightful surprise!

    An X-T1 might be easier to handle, but I don't want to go backward on image quality. I'll try to find a way to make the X-T20 work.
    Marlee Dance 2505- 800x533. Marlee Dance 2505 -- 100%.
     
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  2. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    The lenses you have are probably the worst in the Fuji lineup for shooting weddings. I've shot several weddings after switching to Fuji with great results. But I wouldn't even consider the lenses you have for backup duty. 18-55/55-200 pair with a flash, maybe for backup.
     
  3. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins FujiXspot Regular

    61
    Jul 15, 2015
    Dave Jenkins
    The lenses weren't really a problem for me-- the flash system was, and that was my fault. However, I should also say that the lenses were not acquired with a view to photographing weddings, but for my book projects, for which they're well suited.

    For a number of years I've worked weddings with one Canon 6D and a 28-105 workhorse lens plus the 70-200 f4L for some situations. Juggling two cameras with flashes mounted did not work well for me. The venue simply did not lend itself to available light photography, even if I had a kit of Fuji's fastest lenses.

    In any case, weddings are a business I'm almost out of -- only one more on the books. The lady with whom I've worked as second-shooter for the last few years is winding down her wedding business and transitioning into another field. At this point, I don't feel like breaking in another primary shooter!:shakehead:
     
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  4. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey Super Moderator

    Feb 15, 2013
    Hood River, OR
    Kyle
    If the transmitter worked on the X Pro 1, then it will work on the XT20, if you get the settings right. There's a way to disable the hot shoe, usually unintentionally. That should be something you can figure out with half an hour of googling with the camera in your hands. Once that's sorted, you should be ok again.

    Were it me, I'd have the 27 on the X Pro1, and the 18-135 on the XT20, and that's it. The Pro1 would be what I'd use with available light only, and the XT20 would be set up to work with flash. Variable aperture, 3.5 - 5.6 ... I'd probably just set it at 5.6 so it didn't change exposure shot-to-shot on me. Having said that, the event would be a LOT more pleasant with a 16 f1.4, or a 23 1.4, the 56 1.2, or even the old 35 1.4. You could under-expose by a stop or so, and probably shoot a lot more with just available light. -shrug- But those aren't lenses you're going to buy. Rent, maybe? Two more stops of light is a lot.
     
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  5. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    I've shot weddings with just the 16 1.4 and 56 1.2. Also the 35 f2 and 90 f2. All with great results. I can't imagine the 18-135, 16-50, and 50-230 even being able to lock focus in dimly lit situations found in weddings and receptions.
     
  6. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey Super Moderator

    Feb 15, 2013
    Hood River, OR
    Kyle
    Haven't used the 18-135, or the shorter XC zoom. I know the 50-230 would hunt a bit.
     
  7. BobbyT

    BobbyT Super Moderator Subscribing Member

    Dec 31, 2013
    Louisville, Ky
    Bobby Tingle
    The advantage of the primes is that they open up the aperture all the way to autofocus, even if you are shooting stopped down. Also, most of the primes have better AF motors than the XC zooms.
     
  8. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Twilli53 Subscribing Member

    230
    May 31, 2017
    Central Florida, USA
    Tim Williams
    Yes I would pull out the good primes for a wedding, the f2 trilogy plus maybe a 90 would get it done, while the 16 is well the 16, nuff said. In the zoom department the 18-55 is not a bad performer. I still prefer prime over any zoom for any situation except sports. And then their damn fast , expensive zooms. But they get the job done with a lot less effort and worry.
     
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  9. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins FujiXspot Regular

    61
    Jul 15, 2015
    Dave Jenkins
    I don't own the good primes and can't afford to buy them for the very few weddings I may do in the future. The lenses I have are excellent for the work I am mostly doing and plan to do going forward.

    Setting the focus for manual and using the back-button technique, I had surprisingly little difficulty in a rather dark venue. I didn't use the 50-230 at the wedding, but was very pleased with its performance under stage lighting at the Knoxville Symphony's Christmas program.
     
  10. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins FujiXspot Regular

    61
    Jul 15, 2015
    Dave Jenkins
    That's exactly what I plan to do, Kyle, and I think that setup will work well for me once I get the kinks worked out. I thought I might have to go to an X-T1, which I could do, but don't want to go backward on image quality, or an X-T2, which I really can't afford right now, for better handling, but the addition of a smart but inexpensive black leather half-case (with red stitching!) definitely helps the X-T20's handling.
     
  11. KillRamsey

    KillRamsey Super Moderator

    Feb 15, 2013
    Hood River, OR
    Kyle
    Sounds like a plan.
     
  12. Covey22

    Covey22 FujiXspot Veteran

    358
    May 21, 2015
    Armando J. Heredia
    Stage / Concert is one of the most demanding types of photography. Unfortunately, if you're in a fixed position, you shoot with with what you have. Been there, definitely done that, which is why I offer to shoot the dress rehearsals of all performances my kids are in. I've rarely been turned down. I get the shots I want, the show directors get free and reasonably decent photography.

    As for flash at events, I've been using EF flashes with Canon E-TTL cables off-shoe. No major complaints, but I have to say that Nikon really got it right with TTL and Matrix. It's a bit more work to get even OEM flashes to operate as well.